The Importance of Taking Care of the Caregiver

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For cancer patients, receiving a diagnosis is often a time of fear, stress and trauma. The fear of the unknown, treatment processes and the disruption to life’s routines can be overwhelming. The experience is life altering, not only for the patient but also for family and close friends. For certain, life will never be the same for all involved.

While the initial focus and turmoil centers around the patient, the emotional impact on those who step up to be caregivers are too often overlooked. The dedication of time and resources to drive the patient to their frequent treatments, look in on them to monitor the therapies’ progress and extend their understanding and emotional support can be significant. Truly, no one fights cancer alone.

Being a caregiver can be very challenging. Many caregivers are close family and friends who are impacted equally by the diagnosis. The experience often creates a new role and unprecedented change for friend and family relationships. Feelings of confusion and stress accompany the changes in daily routines for all involved. Once relatively equal give and take relationships are now tipped more toward the cancer patient. Over an extended period of time this unbalanced set of emotional and physical needs can leave a caregiver feeling depressed and overwhelmed.

Educating yourself about the patient’s disease and the therapies and treatments they will be experiencing can help a caregiver cope with the challenges that lie ahead.  “I remember it was important for me to understand the kind of breast cancer my wife (Viola) had,” says Nathan Jones.  “It was triple-negative, so it was very aggressive. Because I had learned everything I could about Viola’s cancer, I understood that even though she wasn’t sick in bed or even in pain, her cancer was going to grow fast and we needed to be proactive.” Knowing and understanding is nearly always better and less stressful.

Many caregivers admit, usually in hindsight, that they took on too much. Accepting help from others and sharing feelings of being over taxed is never easy, but having someone assist with routine chores like cooking, cleaning, shopping and yardwork can relieve the pressure on a caregiver’s time, energy and feelings of inadequacy.  Focusing on your own needs, hopes, and desires can give you the strength to meet new challenges and understand conflicting feelings.

Support groups dedicated to caring for the caregiver are widely available in small group settings or online. Studies show that talking with others about what you’re dealing with is very important. It’s especially helpful when you feel overwhelmed or want to say things that you can’t say to your loved one with cancer.

Keeping a journal has been shown to help relieve negative feelings and stress. Share your journey with others who show interest.  Ken Owenson, caregiver and husband to a breast cancer patient says, “We find a lot of strength from sitting down with patients and giving them a place to vent some of their anxiety, and it also gives us a chance to clear our minds, too.  It’s not good to internalize it because that just makes it worse.”

For more information on how you can better manage your caregiver journey, contact the cancer care specialists at https://gettysburgcancercenter.com/contact-us/.

Understanding the Nexus of Aging and the Increase in Cancer Risk

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As Americas’ Greatest Generation continue to age studies are revealing that with the increase in the age of the population comes an increase in cancer risk. The nexus of age and cancer is supported by National Cancer Institute (NCI) research. The convergence of an overall aging population and a peak cancer incidence among those aged 65 to 74 will result in a significant rise in the number of people diagnosed with cancer. In addition, as people age the types of treatments and the eligibility and ability for older patients to participate in clinical trials diminishes.

According to the most recent statistical data from NCI’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, the median age of a cancer diagnosis is 66 years. The median age at diagnosis is 61 years for breast cancer, 68 years for colorectal cancer, 70 years for lung cancer, and 66 years for prostate cancer.

Healthcare professionals treating older cancer patients often discover other health conditions that may limit the use of specific therapies. Unless there is sufficient evidence that older patients can benefit from standard dosage of some therapies, clinicians can be reluctant to give older patients potentially beneficial treatments. This practice of less intensive therapy in aging patients is historically understandable; however, a growing field of geriatric oncologists now consider chronological age insufficient evidence for denying aggressive cancer therapy.

The solution to this aging dilemma, like the disease, is complex and we need to better understand how the biological underpinnings of aging affect the onset and trajectory of cancer. Reasons for this increase of cancer with aging can be contributed to the fact that living longer increases our exposure to things that have been shown to be contributing factors in determining cancer risk, such as exposure to sunlight, radiation, environmental toxins and noxious by-products of metabolism that increase with age. “Most aging cells develop genomic changes that make them more susceptible to the carcinogens in the environment,” says oncologist Lodovico Balducci, who studies and treats cancer in the elderly at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla. In addition, the various immune defenses that keep our tissues healthy begin to break down with age.

Some of the more serious health conditions that are more common in adults over 65 that may impact the response to a cancer diagnosis include; high blood pressure, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, kidney disease and arthritis. These co-existing conditions must be taken into account when designing cancer treatment protocols for older patients. For those older patients with cancer, knowing how treatments will be affected by these contributing factors is important to understanding how to respond to the process of therapy.

But progress towards better understanding is underway. A joint collaborative effort with the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation is underway which will promote and support interdisciplinary research projects, sharing of resources, and development of new technologies and approaches to better understand how the physiological changes associated with aging affect cancer development, progression, and response to therapy. NCI is also committing more resources aimed to increase enrollment for older patients in clinical trials.