Cancer Diagnosis: A Second Opinion Can Often Lead to the Best Treatment Plan

Most of us would not consider making a major modification to our home without consulting a number of professionals or contractors. After all, getting more than one perspective on the scope of work can reveal a clear understanding of the costs, the potential inconveniences of the process, better prepare for the complexities of the work and more clearly define our expectations. Few of us would argue against the benefits of investing the time and patience in getting a second opinion.

Research shows that half of the patients diagnosed with serious illnesses such as cancer, never seek a second opinion before embarking on a series of treatments for a sometimes life threatening disease. The data reflects that only three percent considered a second opinion to be essential before accepting a diagnosis or course of action. Considering complexities of cancer and the importance of selecting the right course of action for each specific type, it is not just a good idea to initiate a second opinion, it is imperative to understanding all your options and establishing confidence in your final decision. Such important health decisions should be made only after you have learned all you can about your diagnosis, prognosis, available and treatment options.

Several reasons why so many fail to seek a second opinion can be easily explained. A cancer diagnosis is scary; and many patients feel a need to act immediately on a course of treatment to have the best chance of survival. But while in some cases taking immediate action is imperative, most cancer patients have time to learn all there is about their disease before setting out on the treatment journey. Others feel a sense of unquestioned confidence in their personal physician’s ability to diagnose and treat their condition. They often feel that questioning their results could be seen as an insult to their doctor.

Medicine is not an exact science. Even new advancements in treatment options, even the most dedicated and conscientious of practitioners cannot be expected to have the latest science at their fingertips. Many doctors are not only very comfortable with their patients seeking a second opinion, most routinely recommend the action. The results of  “a 2006 study found that when breast cancer patients came to a specialty center for a second opinion, recommendations for surgery changed for more than half, a result of different interpretations and readings of mammograms and biopsy results.”

After Greg Walde received an initial oncology evaluation and treatment at a local oncology center in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania he was told, that due to the advanced stage of his disease, he had little time to live. He was informed that there simply were no effective treatment options for his advanced stage of cancer. The disease, he was informed, had just progressed too far. “At that point,” Greg says, “I went home, very down about things”. After several weeks of distress and depression over his situation he decided to seek another opinion at The Gettysburg Cancer Center just down the street from where he had previously received the bad news. In Greg’s case the value of a second opinion included new treatment options and more time at living his life.

When faced with a cancer diagnosis it becomes critical to find the right oncology center with the experience and dedication to provide the latest and most appropriate medical treatment and support available to fight the battle. At his Gettysburg Cancer Center in Gettysburg, PA, Dr. Satish Shah, Medical Oncologist/Hematologist says, “We understand that every person is unique. Our team is dedicated to providing the latest approaches to treatment in a caring environment for patients and their families to insure the best possible outcome for their cancer treatment.”

For more information on the Gettysburg Cancer Center, visit www.gettysburgcancercenter.com.

“No One Fights Alone”

Receiving a cancer diagnosis is a shocking experience even for those in more advanced life stages. It is a situation that most of us fear at some point in our lives. However, for those that receive a diagnosis at an early age when transitioning from adolescents to young adulthood, the ability to cope and process the significance of the news must be particularly challenging.

As a teenager in 2015, Chandler Banko’s was diagnosed with advanced, stage 2 Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. An athletic and seemingly healthy seventeen year old, Chandler’s news that he had cancer wasn’t made any easier to understand by knowing that the most common age of diagnosis of this cancer is between 20 and 40 years of age.

Hodgkin lymphoma, also known as Hodgkin’s disease, is a type of cancer affecting the lymphatic system which occurs “when the lymph node cells or the lymphocytes begin to multiply uncontrollably, producing malignant cells that have the abnormal ability to invade other tissues throughout the body.” Generally more common in males than females, the exact cause of Hodgkin lymphoma is not known. Nearly 574,000 people reported having the cancer in 2015, a disease which presents in about 2 percent of the Nation’s population. Because of progress in treating Hodgkin lymphoma, most people with a diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma will be long-time survivors. For those under twenty, the survival rate is 97 percent.

A positive and outgoing personality, Chandler found help and treatment at the Gettysburg Cancer Center in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. There he found experienced professionals who are dedicated to treating not only the science of his disease but the personal emotional conditions that often accompany a cancer diagnosis and regiment of treatment. “My experience with GCC was way beyond my expectations” Chandler says in his testimonial video. “They never failed to support me and made sure I kept fighting”.

Chandler, his family and friends established a trust fund for the purpose of paying his unreimbursed medical expenses as well as support for education expenses. A student at nearby Mount Saint Mary’s University in Emmittsburg, Maryland, Chandler is active as a personality at the Universities WMTB Mount Radio as he pursues a degree in Cyber Security and Business. All while holding down a job at a local sports apparel shop.

Recently the “Ladies” at Gettysburg Cancer Center gifted him a bunch of balloons in celebration of his 20th birthday. They all surprised him during a follow-up appointment by singing Happy Birthday. “Love these people!!!” said Chandler.

Looking back on his fight to survive his cancer, Chandler speaks of his experience. “If I had one thing to take away from this past year, it’s to never turn back and keep looking forward. To everyone who walked with me, fought with me, prayed for me and supported me, thank you. Today, I am officially done with everything pertaining to my fight. I completed my final surgery and I am proud to say: I am clear, I am healthy and I am moving on. I can now focus on living my life and enjoying everything it gives me. Life can be short, life can throw you around…. but it all depends on how you take those negatives, and build yourself up.”

Cancer of the Vallecula Can be Difficult to Treat

The Vallecula is an anatomic term for a crevice, furrow or depression and while several vallecula can be located in several areas of the body the term is most commonly used to describe a depression just behind the root of the tongue between the folds in the throat. Cancers involving the vallecula are classified as oropharyngeal cancers.

When David Magee was diagnosed with cancer of the vallecula in March 2016, he learned that his cancer was particularly difficult to treat, given the close proximity of the vallecula to the base of the tongue and voice box. “I was particularly nervous going into it (treatment) for that reason, says David. Early stage cancers of the oropharynx are generally treated with radiation therapy because of the difficulty of surgical access. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and pharynx accounts for over 48,250 cases per year in the United States with approximately 9,575 deaths per year. Symptoms of head and neck cancers include: persistent pain, difficulty swallowing, voice changes, mouth sores, dry mouth, changes in appearance, and/or taste changes. Patients with a history of tobacco and alcohol use are at a high risk for these cancers.

David sought treatment at Gettysburg Cancer Center in Gettysburg Pennsylvania, a small town in the central part of the state famous for the great Civil War battle. “I have recommended others to come over here to this Cancer Center who may have sought treatment elsewhere at places like John Hopkins or Hershey Medical Center or places like that. People don’t always realize that there are places with this kind of expertise right here in Gettysburg.”

“No one has been more scared about the treatment process than I was…right away I was put at ease…I always felt that I was in great hands,” Said David. “I had thirty-five radiation treatments which were a little intimidating, but everything went well and I actually began to miss the people here when I was finished with my treatments.”

For David’s complete thoughts on his cancer and experience at the Gettysburg Cancer Center click on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yWe0x6PCwmQ.