The Value of a Second Opinion Provides Alternative Treatment to a Cancer Patient

When faced with a cancer diagnosis, it becomes critical to find the right oncology center that will provide the appropriate medical treatment and emotion support to fight the battle. One Gettysburg resident, when faced with a stage-4 cancer diagnosis, found the right support at Gettysburg Cancer Center (GCC), a growing comprehensive cancer center.

Greg Wale received an initial oncology evaluation and treatment at another local oncology center in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The diagnosis showed that cancerous tumors had grown to 4 and 5 inches in diameter and had migrated to the liver, bone, thyroid glands and colon. Greg was just 57 year’s old and was told by oncologists that he had little time to live. There simply were no treatment options for his advanced stage of cancer. The disease, he was informed, had just progressed too far.

“At that point,” Greg says, “I went home, very down about things”. After several weeks of distress and depression over the state of his situation, he drew upon his faith and was “spiritually lead” to the Gettysburg Cancer Center (GCC), just down the block from where he had previously received the bad news. It was here that the centers principle oncologist, Dr. Shah, sat down with Greg to review his case. “I felt very comfortable here where there was a lot of very concerned people with caring hearts,” recounts Greg.

He immediately felt the staff at GCC wanted to help and he sensed that things were going to be different in this place where everyone seemed like family. Dr. Shah and his expert team designed a plan to attack his disease and provide as much time as possible for Greg’s future. With no guarantees, the team embarked upon an individualized course of treatment. After a couple of months, new tests revealed that the progression of the disease appeared to be slowing. According to Greg, “None of us knows how much time we have but it looks like I’m going to have more of it than what was told to me when I was first diagnosed thanks to Dr. Shah and this facility.”

For more than 25 years, Gettysburg Cancer Center has been committed to providing cancer care in a community-based setting close to home. The all-encompassing oncology and hematology programs provide a complete range of diagnosis and treatment. “Here at Gettysburg Cancer Center we understand that each patient and their disease are unique, requiring different approaches to insure the best possible outcome for each patient. Our family of caring and educated staff strives to provide insightful, compassionate care to all of our patients.” says Dr. Shah.

In this case, the value of a second opinion meant a new treatment option and more time for this cancer patient. To view the full patient testimonial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=448eg4F_SEg&feature=youtu.be.

Finding the Emotional Support You Need to Recover From Cancer

March Blog 1 Image

The discovery that you have cancer comes with many intense emotions, not only for the patient but also for close family members and friends. After the initial emotional and psychological effects of the news subsides, there is a realization that everything in your life is about to change. Daily routines, family roles and future plans will be determined by a regiment of treatments and medications that often pose additional physical symptoms and challenges to everyday living.

The support of family and friends during this process is critical to help the patient regain a sense of normalcy and maintain emotional stability. Efforts such as pier group support and individual therapy can help reduce distress and help cope with the personal emotions that come with a cancer diagnosis. Such support can play a critical role in determining the your clinical outcome.

Musa Mayer, a cancer survivor and patient advocate says, “Belonging to a group where you can discuss anything and everything is very freeing. You can talk about everything from medical treatments to lack of sexual interest, to fury at someone who has cut you off while driving. The loneliness and isolation that so many feel when they are going through the breast cancer journey can be helped, if not erased.”

Your doctor and their professional associates and nursing staff will also play a central role in providing coordination and support during treatment and recovery. “We have to look at a person’s medical care from a holistic perspective,” says Terri Ades, MS, APRN-BC, AOCN, director of cancer information at the American Cancer Society in Atlanta. Nurses are a patient’s greatest advocate.” Whether an oncology nurse or a nurse practitioner, these specially trained medical professionals become an important facilitator in managing overall care.

At his Gettysburg Cancer Center in Gettysburg, PA, Dr. Satish Shah, Medical Oncologist/Hematologist provides all-encompassing oncology and hematology programs with a complete range of diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care. “It is our educated staff that set us apart from many other cancer centers,” says Dr. Shah, “We understand that every person is unique, each with their own set of psychological, emotional, and spiritual needs. Our team is dedicated to providing a caring environment for each individual patient and their families to insure the best possible outcome for their cancer treatment.”

In addition to your professional caregivers, The American Cancer Society has programs and services to help people with cancer and their loved ones understand cancer, manage their lives through treatment and recovery, and find the emotional support you need.